Cookie hacks with Betty Crocker’s Cookie Mixes

Hello, house-bound mumshies!

Have you gone on a baking spree already?

If you still haven’t thrown yourself into one of the quarantine’s most popular pastimes because you lack the time, ingredients or equipment, let me share with you some hacks that will have you donning on your apron, ready to bake.

Let’s start you off with simple treats that will surely win the hearts (and tummies!) of the youngsters and adults alike: cookies!

Betty Crocker Cookie Mixes

Betty Crocker Cookie Mixes

Cookies seem to have been originated in 7th century Persia, a little while after the use of sugar became common in the region. Through the Muslim conquest of Spain, this baked goodies spread throughout Europe. It was said to have come to America through the Dutch in New Amsterdam in the 1620s with the Dutch word koekje latet Anglicized to “cookie.”

Since then, exciting cookie variants have been introduced, giving cookie fans more reasons to love their favorite baked treat.

Betty Crocker Cookie Mixes

Bringing these bits of sweet happiness to your home even got a whole lot easier with these beloved cookie flavors in packaged mixes from Betty Crocker.

Betty Crocker Cookie Mixes

Betty Crocker got its start back in 1921 through a sales promotion ran by Gold Medal Flour targeting home cooks. Along with the entries, flour milling company Washburn Crosby Company (the predecessor of General Mills, Inc.), received a deluge of questions about baking. The name Betty Crocker was formulated to personalize responses to these queries.

Today, Betty Crocker is considered an icon of food expertise and reliable products, offering reliable and accessible recipes, sound cooking advice and dependable products. Its trademark red spoon and the Betty Crocker brand evokes that feeling of warmth and homeyness.

Among its products are the Betty Crocker Cookie Mixes. These mixes have no colors, no artificial flavors and no preservatives, just honest-to-goodness ingredients that will enable home cooks to have freshly baked treats from bowl to oven in minutes.

Betty Crocker Cookie Mixes

Betty Crocker Cookie Mixes

Betty Crocker Cookie Mixes

And really, these cookie mixes are so easy to use; I made three flavors of cookies using just my trusty mixing bowl, a fork, a 1 1/2-in diameter ice cream scoop, and, of course, my trusty oven (preheated to 375 deg F (190 deg C).

Betty Crocker Cookie Mixes

Betty Crocker Cookie Mixes

Betty Crocker Cookie Mixes

Each 17.5oz (496g) cookie mix bag produces twenty-four 3-inch cookies, enough to sate the cravings of any cookie fan.

Chocolate Chip Cookie

This beloved cookie was invented in 1938 by chefs Ruth Graves Wakefield for the Toll House Inn in Massachusetts, then a popular spot for home cooking. She chopped bits from a Nestle semi-sweet chocolate bar into a cookie dough made with flour, butter, brown and white sugar and vanilla, and a legendary cookie was born.

Betty Crocker Cookie Mixes

The Hack: Betty Crocker Chocolate Chip Cookie Mix

Betty Crocker Cookie Mixes

Mix together the cookie mix, one stick (1/2 cup) softened butter and egg until a soft dough forms.

Scoop the dough into round balls and drop them in an ungreased cookie sheet two inches apart.

Bake for nine to eleven minutes or until edges are light golden brown.

Each cookie is chewy and bursting with sweetness, a sure hit for kids and adults alike!

Betty Crocker Cookie Mixes

Buy this at Landers or Shopee.

Oatmeal Cookie

A descendant of the traditional Scottish oatcakes which has been around since the middle ages, the recipe of the oatmeal cookie was first published in 1896 by Fannie Merritt Farmer author of the Boston Cooking School Cook Book. When it became popular in the US in the early 1900s, it was considered a health food due to the increased fiber content from the oatmeal.

Betty Crocker Cookie Mixes

The Hack: Betty Crocker Oatmeal Cookie Mix

Betty Crocker Cookie Mixes

Mix together the cookie mix, one stick (1/2 cup) softened butter, 1 tbsp water and egg until a slightly stiff dough forms.

Scoop the dough into round balls and drop them in an ungreased cookie sheet two inches apart.

Bake for ten to twelve minutes or until edges are light golden brown.

A bit heftier when compared to other cookies, this moist and chewy oatmeal cookie packs a lot of texture as well as flavor in each bite.

Betty Crocker Cookie Mixes

Buy this at Landers or Shopee.

Peanut Butter Cookie

The peanut butter cookie was invented in the 1910s by George Washington Carver when he published a peanut cookbook to promote the crop. While his original recipes called for chopped nuts, these were substituted in later iterations with peanut butter, and a classic cookie fave came to be.

Betty Crocker Cookie Mixes

The Hack: Betty Crocker Peanut Butter Cookie

Betty Crocker Cookie Mixes

Mix together the cookie mix, three tbsp vegetable oil, 1 tbsp water and egg until a soft dough forms.

Scoop the dough into round balls and drop them in an ungreased cookie sheet two inches apart.

Bake for nine to eleven minutes or until edges are light golden brown.

From the smell of peanut butter wafting to your nostrils to the satisfying bites into salty-sweet chewiness, this cookie is a feast for the senses.

Betty Crocker Cookie Mixes

(Traditionally, fork marks are associated to the peanut butter cookie. I just forgot to apply them before baking, my bad!)

Buy this at Landers or Shopee.

Want some more cookie hacks?

Allow the cookies to cool for one minute on the cookie sheet before removing them.

Baked too many? Store leftovers in an airtight container and reheat in a 300 deg F (150 deg C) oven for four to six minutes or until warm

Want to save some cookie dough to be baked later? Place the dough balls in a container with lid and place in a freezer. You can pop these in the oven and bake for few minutes longer.

Betty Crocker Cookie Mixes

Betty Crocker Cookie Mixes

So stock up on these cookie mixes so you can easily treat the fam to bites of cookie happiness at home.

Check out my other product reviews:

Author: Gel Jose

Manic Pixie Dream Girl Wannabe, Imagineer, Foodie, TV Addict and Lifelong Learner

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