Camille Prats’ share tips to make kids love eating veggies

“I really used to struggle kasi hate na hate talaga ng kids ko dati ang veggies – ayaw nila yung taste. Taste is so important for kids, so I ensure na dapat na-eenjoy nila mga sineserve ko.”

Camille Prats

Have you sat with your kids way past mealtime just to make sure they eat their veggies on the plate? How about resorting to bargaining more gadget time for just one more bite of that carrots? Well, you’re definitely not the only momma doing that. Even celebrities like Camille Prats have to do a bit of negotiating just to get her kids to eat their veggies.

Luckily, she shares some handy hacks with Spot.ph to do the trick without the crying, the bargaining, and the unnecessary drama that fills mealtime.

Tang Oh My Gulay
Tang Oh My Gulay

Here are 3 easy peasy ways to get your kids to eat their veggies according to Camille:

  • Oh My Gulay! May Gulay! – Instead of only serving your kids veggies, partner your kids’ meals with Tang Fruit & Veg. It comes in two flavors: Orange Carrot, which has the Vitamin C from oranges and Vitamin A from carrots, and Dalandan Malunggay, which has the Vitamin C from dalandan and the Iron of malunggay. Tang Fruit & Veg has the delicious taste of fruits AND the nutrition from veggies in a drink that kids love! Camille can vouch this – her kids love its taste so much, they actually ask her for it themselves! Yummy na, masustansya pa! Oh My Gulay! Shop the NEW Tang Fruit & Veg here.
  • SmartMom Recipes – No need to work hard, just work smart! Incorporate veggies in delectable recipes that you know your kids will surely love. Your kids won’t notice that veggies are actually the main ingredient because of its delicious taste!
  • Appearance is key – Kids are very visual so it’s really all about making their plate look fun! Focus on making veggies look appetizing by using creative shapes and brightly colored bowls to increase their appetite. You can even add in their favorite animal or cartoon character for that extra wow factor! You can go as simple as making trees out of broccoli or more complex as making pirates from cucumbers– the idea stays the same: make it fun!

Images and details provided in a recent press release.

What we need in dealing with a child with special needs

Being a mom of a child with special needs, I sometimes balk at the enormity of the added responsibility. I feel guilty at times for thinking that while parenting is hard enough, it is sometimes made harder by having to contend with the all the extra support, attention and understanding required by a special needs child.

The reality is that, as with all life, there are good times as well as bad; and some days are better or worse than others. I’m grateful that, for the most part, the good times far outweigh the bad.

My son is in the autism spectrum which means that he has difficulties with communication and social interaction. He has overcome a lot of his previous difficulties in managing himself in social situations at home and in school. In fact, far from the stereotype of kids with autism who have difficulty looking people in the eye, he has grown gregarious and friendly, waving and saying hi to strangers in restaurants and malls (which present a new set of problems).

Still, he struggles with schoolwork. For instance, while he is already included in mainstream classes, his reading level is not at the proper level for his age. His difficulties at school prompt those little nagging doubts in my head about his future and how he will need to cope with more and more challenges as he grows older.

These doubts lead me to thinking on what I need to provide to help him deal with what he needs to face, in the present and future.

Fortunately, in a recent seminar held at his school, assistant chief of DepEd’s SPED Unit Dr. Elvira Rocal effectively sums up these points in her talk “3 C’s in Educating Learners with Special Needs in the 21st Century.” You would think that these C’s would involve technology but they are pretty much basic and common-sense.

Learners with Special Education Needs (LSEN) would benefit from:

  • Connection. Being wired differently from their peers and even their own family can feel very isolating. They need to feel like they’re still a part of our group, that they belong. We need to build emotional connections with them to motivate them to learn and to minimize their feelings of isolation. Since my son is a budding foodie, I try to interest him in learning how to prepare simple meals and how he can add his own touch to his food. I am proud to say that he can prepare his own bowl of cereal every morning (a simple task for most but a significant feat for us) and has incorporated his own variations such as using his Milo as a substitute for milk to suit his taste.
  • Collaboration. They say it takes a village to raise a child. It is even more so when it comes to raising a special needs child. You would need to rely on the expertise and help of developmental pediatricians, therapists, teachers and school personnel in assessing and providing for the requirements of special needs kids. At home, I have come to rely on my daughter, #ExhibitA, in helping my son with his homework and projects. My son also has a network of grandparents, uncles and aunts, and family friends who treat him as just another ordinary kid while also on the lookout for opportunities to help him with his special needs.
  • Compassion. I have come to accept that there will be things that my son will always have difficulty with. In many ways, he will never be like other kids his age. However, he has his own point of view and opinions that he wants to express and his own wants and dreams that he wants to achieve. My role as his mom is not to regret what he cannot do, but to encourage and celebrate what he can.

Raising and educating a special needs child is already a huge challenge and responsibility. If you are a parent dealing with this situation, do reach out to professionals who can help you and to your family and community as well.

Click here to see Smart Parenting’s list of developmental pediatricians in Metro Manila.

Click here to know more about the Special Education Unit of the Department of Education (DepEd).

Read this post about my initial struggles with my son’s condition.

For more information on supporting the learning efforts of kids with special needs, check out these books on Amazon.com:


Parents and Families of Students With Special Needs: Collaborating Across the Age Span 


How the Special Needs Brain Learns Third Edition


Steps to Independence: Teaching Everyday Skills to Children with Special Needs, Fourth Edition 4th Edition

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